Filozofická Fakulta

Ronald Kim

Research interests

  • Historical linguistics of Indo-European (esp. Tocharian, Iranian, Greek, Celtic, Anatolian, Balto-Slavic) and Semitic (esp. Aramaic)
  • Sociolinguistics and language variation; language contact; dialect geography; regional and ethnic variation in North American English
  • Phonology, esp. autosegmental, nonlinear, and prosodic
  • Pidgin and creole linguistics (esp. English-based contact languages of the Pacific)
  • Languages of Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Central Asia

Education and academic employment 

  • (born 25th December 1975, Perth Amboy, New Jersey, USA)
  • 1992-1996: A.B., Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University
  • 1996-2002: Ph.D., Department of Linguistics, University of Pennsylvania
  • 2002-2003: Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Cornell University
  • 2004-2006: Visiting Lecturer, Department of Linguistics, University of Pennsylvania; Visiting Lecturer, Department of English, Temple University
  • 2005-2007: Visiting Assistant Professor and Phonetics Lab Coordinator, Linguistics
  • Department, Swarthmore College
  • 2007-2009: Visiting Professor, Institute of English Philology, Wrocław University
  • 2009- : Visiting Professor, Department of Old Germanic Languages, Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań

Publications

Monographs
  1. Tocharian and the Indo-European Verb. (Studies in Indo-European Languages & Linguistics.) Leiden/Boston: Brill. (under review)
  2. Topics in the Reconstruction and Development of Indo-European Accent. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, University of Pennsylvania. (Abstract available at <http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI3054962/>.)
Edited volumes
  1. Hackstein, Olav and Ronald I. Kim, eds. 2012. Linguistic Developments along the Silk Road: Archaism and Innovation in Tocharian. (Philosophisch-Historische Klasse, Sitzungsberichte, 834. Band. Iranische Onomastik, Nr. 12. Multilingualism and History of Knowledge, Vol. II.) Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. <http://verlag.oeaw.ac.at/products/Sachgebiete/Orientalistik/Multilingualism-and-History-of-Knowledge-Vol-2-Linguistic-Developments-Along-the-Silkroad.html>
  2. Nagasaki, Hiroko, ed. 2012. Indian and Persian Prosody and Recitation. English edition by Ronald I. Kim. Delhi: Saujanya. <http://www.saujanyabooks.com/details.aspx?id=38211>
  3. Weinreich, Uriel. 2011. Languages in Contact: French, German, and Romansh in Twentieth-Century Switzerland. With an introduction and notes by Ronald I. Kim and William Labov. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. <http://benjamins.com/catalog/z.166>
  4. Kim, Ronald, Norbert Oettinger, Elisabeth Rieken, and Michael Weiss, eds. 2010. Ex Anatolia Lux: Anatolian and Indo-European Studies in Honor of H. Craig Melchert on the Occasion of His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Ann Arbor/New York: Beech Stave. <http://www.beechstave.com/melchert.htm>
Articles
  1. A problem of forward reconstruction: North Slavic vs. South Slavic . (in progress)
  2. “Is there such a thing?” Problems and priorities in the study of Asian American English. (in progress)
  3. Notes on Armenian historical phonology. To appear in a Festschrift. (in progress)
  4. On the morphological prehistory of the Tocharian infinitive. (in progress)
  5. The evolution of nonlinear morphology: palatalization and root structure in Tocharian A. (in progress)
  6. Observations on Tocharian duals and Auslautgesetze. To appear in Tocharian and Indo-European Studies.
  7. The phonology of Balto-Slavic. To appear in Comparative Indo-European Linguistics: An International Handbook of Language Comparison and the Reconstruction of Indo-European, ed. by Brian Joseph and Jared Klein. Berlin: de Gruyter, 2015.
  8. A tale of two suffixes: *-h2-, *-ih2-, and the evolution of feminine gender in Indo-European. In Studies on the Collective and Feminine in Indo-European from a Diachronic and Typological Perspective, ed. by Sergio Neri and Roland Schuhmann. (Brill’s Studies in Indo-European Languages & Linguistics, Vol. 11.) Leiden: Brill, 2014, pp. 115-36.
  9. Ablative and comitative in Tocharian. In Das Nomen im Indogermanischen: Morphologie, Substantiv versus Adjektiv, Kollektivum. Akten der Arbeitstagung der Indogermanischen Gesellschaft vom 14. bis 16. September 2011 in Erlangen, hrsg. von Norbert Oettinger und Thomas Steer. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 2014, pp. 129-39.
  10. An explosive etymology. To appear in Chatreššar 2010-11 [2014].
  11. Metrical grid theory, internal derivation, and the reconstruction of PIE nominal accent paradigms. In Indo-European Accent and Ablaut, ed. by Götz Keydana, Paul Widmer, and Thomas Olander. (Copenhagen Studies in Indo-European, Vol. 5.) Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum, 2013, pp. 63-105.
  12. Eine indirekte Fortsetzung urindogermanischer Prosodie: von Enklise zu Zweitsilbenakzent bei finiten Verben im Tocharischen [An indirect continuation of Proto-Indo-European prosody: from enclisis to second-syllable accent in finite verbs in Tocharian]. In Linguistic Developments along the Silk Road: Archaism and Innovation in Tocharian, ed. by Olav Hackstein and Ronald I. Kim. (Philosophisch-Historische Klasse, Sitzungsberichte, 834. Band. Iranische Onomastik, Nr. 12. Multilingualism and History of Knowledge, Vol. II.) Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2012, pp. 9-32.
  13. The Indo-European, Anatolian, and Tocharian “secondary” cases in typological perspective. In Multi Nominis Grammaticus: Studies in Classical and Indo-European Linguistics in Honor of Alan. J. Nussbaum on the Occasion of his Sixty-Fifth Birthday, ed. by Adam I. Cooper, Jeremy Rau and Michael Weiss. Ann Arbor/New York: Beech Stave, 2012, pp. 121-42.
  14. The PIE thematic animate accusative plural revisited. In The Sound of Indo-European 2: Papers on Indo-European Phonetics, Phonemics and Mophophonemics, ed. by Roman Sukač and Ondřej Šefčík. (LINCOM Studies in Indo-European Linguistics 41.) Munich: LINCOM, 2012, pp. 144-58.
  15. Unus testis, unicus testis? The ablaut of root aorists in Tocharian and Indo-European. In The Indo-European Verb: Proceedings of the Conference of the Society for Indo-European Studies, Los Angeles 13-15 September 2010, ed. by H. Craig Melchert. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 2012, pp. 137-49.
  16. Uriel Weinreich and the birth of modern contact linguistics. In Languages in Contact 2010, ed. by Piotr P. Chruszczewski and Zdzisław Wąsik. (Philologica Wratislaviensia: Acta et Studia, Vol. 4.) Wrocław: Wydawnictwo Wyższej Szkoły Filologicznej we Wrocławiu, 2011, pp. 99-111.
  17. Possible Tocharian evidence for root ablaut in PIE thematic presents? In Ex Anatolia Lux: Anatolian and Indo-European Studies in Honor of H. Craig Melchert on the Occasion of His Sixty-Fifth Birthday, ed. by Ronald I. Kim, Norbert Oettinger, Elisabeth Rieken, and Michael Weiss. Ann Arbor/New York: Beech Stave, 2010, pp. 191-203.
  18. Towards a historical phonology of Modern Aramaic: the relative chronology of Ṭuroyo sound changes. In Camsemud 2007: Proceedings of the 13th Italian Meeting of Afro-Asiatic Linguistics held in Udine, May 21st-24th, 2007, ed. by Frederick Mario Fales and Giulia Francesca Grassi. (History of the Ancient Near East, Monographs, X.) Padua: S.A.R.G.O.N. Editrice e Libreria, 2010, pp. 229-38.
  19. Verbal ablaut and obstruent alternations in Old Persian. Historische Sprachforschung 123 (2010 [2011]), 167-75.
  20. American English dialectology: a historical survey. In Studies in American Language, Culture and Literature, ed. by Piotr P. Chruszczewski and Jacek Fisiak. (Język a komunikacja 24.) Cracow: Tertium, 2009, pp. 48-58.
  21. Another look at Tocharian B ṣarya. Historische Sprachforschung 122 (2009 [2010]), 111-7.
  22. On the prehistory of Old English dyde. In Þe comoun peplis language, ed. by Marcin Krygier and Liliana Sikorska. (Medieval English Mirror, Vol. 6.) Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2009, pp. 9-22.
  23. The feminine gender in Tocharian and Indo-European. In East and West: Papers in Indo-European Studies, ed. by Kazuhiko Yoshida and Brent Vine. Bremen: Hempen, 2009, pp. 69-87.
  24. Tocharian B ‘(to) me’, -c ‘(to) you’, paṣ ‘go!’. Tocharian and Indo-European Studies 11 (2009), 49-61.
  25. An individual twist on the individualizing suffix: definite n-stem nouns in Pontic Greek. Glotta 84 (2008 [2009]), 72-113.
  26. California Chinese Pidgin English and its historical connections: preliminary remarks. Journal of Pidgin and Creole Linguistics 23:2 (2008), 329-44.
  27. Stammbaum or continuum? The subgrouping of Modern Aramaic dialects reconsidered. Journal of the American Oriental Society 128:3 (July-September 2008), 505-31.
  28. The Celtic feminine numerals ‘3’ and ‘4’ revisited. Keltische Forschungen 3 (2008), 143-69; abstract 319-20.
  29. Proto-Indo-European *-ye/o- presents in Tocharian. In Proceedings of the 18th Annual UCLA Indo-European Conference, Los Angeles, November 3-4, 2006, ed. by Karlene Jones-Bley, Martin E. Huld, Angela Della Volpe, and Miriam Robbins Dexter. (Journal of Indo-European Studies Monograph Series, No. 53.) Washington, DC: Institute for the Study of Man, 2007, pp. 47-63.
  30. The Duke of York comes to Xinjiang: ablaut, analogy, and epenthesis in Tocharian nasal presents. Historische Sprachforschung 120:1-2 (2007), 66-104.
  31. The Tocharian subjunctive in light of the h2e-conjugation model. In Verba Docenti: Studies in Historical and Indo-European Linguistics Presented to Jay H. Jasanoff by Students, Colleagues, and Friends, ed. by Alan J. Nussbaum. Ann Arbor/New York: Beech Stave, 2007, pp. 185-200.
  32. Two problems of Ossetic nominal morphology. Indogermanische Forschungen 112 (2007), 47-68.
  33. Vowel weakening in Tocharian A preterite participles and abstract nouns. Kyoto University Linguistic Research 26 (2007), 1-30.
  34. Tocharian. Encyclopedia of Languages and Linguistics. Second edition, ed. by Keith Brown. Oxford: Elsevier, Vol. 12, 2006, pp. 725-7.
  35. Ossetic silæ/syl and the Indo-Iranian word for ‘female’. International Journal of Diachronic Linguistics and Linguistic Reconstruction 2:1 (June 2005), 123-68.
  36. Greek monosyllabic imperatives in -ς: the endurance of a morphophonological pattern. Glotta 80 (2004 [2005]), 95-157.
  37. On the historical phonology of Ossetic: the origin of the oblique case suffix. Journal of the American Oriental Society 123:1 (January-March 2003), 43-71.
  38. Root and derived preterites in Tocharian. Münchener Studien zur Sprachwissenschaft 63 (2003 [2009]), 11-44. [completed 2004, revised 2008]
  39. Uncovering the prehistory of the Tocharian Class II preterite. Historische Sprachforschung 116:2 (2003), 190-233.
  40. The distribution of the Old Irish infixed pronouns, Cowgill’s particle, and the syntactic evolution of Insular Celtic. In Indo-European Perspectives, ed. by Mark Southern. (Journal of Indo-European Studies Monograph Series, No. 43.) Washington, DC: Institute for the Study of Man, 2002, pp. 151-76.
  41. The continuation of Proto-Indo-European lexical accent in ancient Greek: preservation and reanalysis. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics 7:2 (2002), 59-93.
  42. Tocharian B śem ≈ Latin vēnit? Szemerényi’s Law and *ē in PIE root aorists. Münchener Studien zur Sprachwissenschaft 61 (2001), 119-47.
  43. Reexamining the prehistory of Tocharian B ‘ewe’. Tocharian and Indo-European Studies 9 (2000), 37-43.
  44. The distribution of the Old Irish infixed pronouns: evidence for the syntactic evolution of Insular Celtic? University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics 6:3 (2000), 167-87.
  45. ‘To drink’ in Anatolian, Tocharian, and Proto-Indo-European. Historische Sprachforschung 113:1-2 (2000), 151-70.
  46. Observations on the absolute and relative chronology of Tocharian loanwords and sound changes. Tocharian and Indo-European Studies 8 (1999), 111-38.
  47. The development of labiovelars in Tocharian: a closer look. Tocharian and Indo-European Studies 8 (1999), 139-87.
  48. The origin of the Pre-Ossetic oblique case suffix and its implications. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics 6:1 (1999) = Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Penn Linguistics Colloquium, 233-50.
Reviews
  1. Review of Douglas Q. Adams, A Dictionary of Tocharian B. Revised and greatly enlarged. 2 vols. (Leiden Studies in Indo-European 10. Amsterdam/New York: Rodopi, 2013.) To appear in Kratylos.
  2. Review of Michaël Peyrot, The Tocharian Subjunctive: A Study in Syntax and Verbal Stem Formation. (Brill’s Studies in Indo-European Languages & Linguistics, Vol. 8. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2013.) To appear in Orientalistische Literaturzeitung.
  3. Review of Jan Bičovský, Stručná mluvnice praindoeuropštiny. (Prague: Filozofická Fakulta Univerzity Karlovy, 2012.) Kratylos 58 (2013), 199-202.
  4. Review of Melanie Malzahn, The Tocharian Verbal System. (Brill’s Studies in Indo-European Languages & Linguistics, Vol. 3. Leiden: Brill, 2010.) Kratylos 57 (2012), 182-8. [in German]
  5. Review of Toshiya Tanaka, A Morphological Conflation Approach to the Historical Development of Preterite-Present Verbs: Old English, Proto-Germanic, and Proto-Indo-European. (Kyushu University, The Faculty of Languages and Cultures Library, Vol. 2. Fukuoka: Hana Shoin, 2011.) Kratylos 57 (2012), 204-8.
  6. Review of Charles G. Häberl, The Neo-Mandaic Dialect of Khorramshahr. (Semitica Viva 45. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2009.) Journal of the American Oriental Society 131:2 (April-June 2011), 323-7.
  7. Review of Thomas Olander, Balto-Slavic Accentual Mobility. (Trends in Linguistics, Studies and Monographs 199. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2009.) LINGUIST List 21.1909 (21 April 2010), <http://linguistlist.org/issues/21/21-1909.html>.
  8. Review of Georges-Jean Pinault, Chrestomathie tokharienne. Textes et grammaire. (Collection linguistique de la Société de Linguistique de Paris, 95. Leuven/Paris: Peeters, 2008.) Kratylos 55 (2010), 25-34. [in German]
  9. Review of Shabo Talay, Die neuaramäischen Dialekte der Khabur-Assyrer in Nordostsyrien. Einführung, Phonologie und Morphologie (Semitica Viva 40. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2008) and Hezy Mutzafi, The Jewish Neo-Aramaic Dialect of Betanure (Province of Dihok) (Semitica Viva 43. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2008). Journal of the American Oriental Society 130:2 (April-June 2010), 285-9.
  10. Review of Miriam Meyerhoff and Naomi Nagy (eds.), Social Lives in Language — Sociolinguistics and Multilingual Speech Communities. Celebrating the Work of Gillian Sankoff. (IMPACT: Studies in Language and Society 24. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2008.) LINGUIST List 20.2338 (30 June 2009), <http://linguistlist.org/issues/20/20-2338.html>.
  11. Review of Michaël Peyrot, Variation and Change in Tocharian B. (Leiden Studies in Indo-European 15. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2008.) Language 85:3 (September 2009), 736-40.
  12. Review of Melanie Malzahn (ed.), Instrumenta Tocharica. (Heidelberg: Winter, 2007.) Journal of the American Oriental Society 128:4 (October-December 2008), 784-8.
  13. Review of Pieter Muysken (ed.), From Linguistic Areas to Areal Linguistics. (Studies in Language Companion Series 90. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2008.) LINGUIST List 19.3869 (16 December 2008), <http://linguistlist.org/issues/19/19-3869.html>.
  14. Review of Haruyuki Saito, Das Partizipium Präteriti im Tocharischen. (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2006.) Journal of the American Oriental Society 128:1 (January-March 2008), 139-42.
  15. Review of Werner Winter, Kleine Schriften/Selected Writings. 2 Bände, hrsg. von Olav Hackstein. (Bremen: Hempen, 2005.) Kratylos 53 (2008), 46-55. [in German]
  16. Review of Eugen Hill, Untersuchungen zum inneren Sandhi des Indogermanischen. Der Zusammenstoß von Dentalplosiven im Indoiranischen, Germanischen, Italischen und Keltischen. (Münchener Forschungen zur Historischen Sprachwissenschaft, Band 1. Bremen: Hempen, 2003.) Indo-European Studies Bulletin 11:2 (March 2007), 9-15.
  17. Review of Svetlana Burlak, Istoričeskaja fonetika toxarskix jazykov. (Moscow: Institut Vostokovedenija Rossijskoj Akademii Nauk, 2000.) Kratylos 51 (2006), 130-6. [in German]
  18. Review of Johnny Cheung, Studies in the Historical Development of the Ossetic Vocalism. (Wiesbaden: Reichert, 2002.) Indo-European Studies Bulletin 11:1 (September 2005), 53-6.
  19. Review of Jay H. Jasanoff, Hittite and the Indo-European Verb. (Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.) Diachronica 22:1 (2005), 191-200.

Lectures and presentations

Block seminars
  1. “Westgermanisch historisch-vergleichend [Historical-comparative grammar of West Germanic].” Institute for Comparative and Indo-European Linguistics, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, 29 November, 6 December 2011, 31 January 2012; 11 December 2012; 19-20 December 2014.
  2. “Introduction to Tocharian.” Jena Summer School in Indo-European, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, 1-5 September 2014. (with Hannes Fellner and Georges-Jean Pinault)
  3. “Introduction to Tocharian.” Institute for Comparative Linguistics, Charles University of Prague, 19-23 November 2012.
Plenary lectures
  1. “Uriel Weinreich and the birth of modern contact linguistics.” Conference on “Languages in Contact”, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wrocław Branch/Wrocław University/Philological School of Higher Education in Wrocław, 21-23 May 2010.
  2. “Canton to California, Hawai‘i to Australia: Chinese Pidgin English and the history of Pidgin English in the Pacific.” Fifth Conference on Teaching of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature (TELL), National Kaohsiung Normal University, 21 April 2008.
Invited lectures
  1. “All in the family: the prehistory of English and its relatives at the Faculty of English.” 111 Years of English Studies in Poznań (1903-2014), Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań, 26-27 April 2014.
  2. “Thoughts on the PIE subjunctive.” Institute for Comparative Linguistics, Charles University of Prague, 27 May 2013.
  3. “Thematic inflection and the thematic subjunctive in Indo-European: the Tocharian evidence.” Department of Linguistics, Harvard University, 27 March 2013.
  4. “Weinreich revisited: sixty years of studying language in its social context.” Department of Linguistics, University of Pennsylvania, 6 February 2012.
  5. “The linguistic consequences of the Industrial Revolution: immigration and regional ideology in the evolution of American English.” Talking Heads Lecture Series, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Kingston University, 30 September 2010.
  6. “What “European” mummies? The Tocharian languages and their speakers, in myth and reality.” Institute of Oriental Philology, Jagiellonian University, 12 May 2010.
  7. “Wstęp do gramatyki historycznej języków tocharskich [Introduction to the historical grammar of the Tocharian languages].” Institute of Classical Philology, Jagiellonian University, 12 May 2010.
  8. “Typological change in progress: the evolution of nonlinear morphology in an older Indo-European language.” Phon&Phon (Phonetics and Phonology) lecture series, School of English, Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań, 18 November 2009.
  9. “Eine indirekte Fortsetzung urindogermanischer Prosodie? Zweitsilbenakzent bei finiten Verben im Tocharischen [An indirect continuation of Proto-Indo-European prosody? Second-syllable accent in finite verbs in Tocharian].” Institute for Comparative and Indo-European Linguistics, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, 1 July 2009.
  10. “Zum Ursprung des femininen Genus im Indogermanischen [On the origin of the feminine gender in Indo-European].” Institute for Comparative and Indo-European Linguistics, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, 25 January 2008.
  11. Stammbaum or continuum? The state of Modern Aramaic.” Linguistics Department, Swarthmore College, 13 February 2007. (See report by Myles Dakan in The Swarthmore Gazette, <http://daily.swarthmore.edu/ 2007/2/14/stammbaum-or-continuum-the-state-of-modern-aramaic/>.)
  12. “Indo-European origins of the Slavic verb: stem-vowel lengthening in derived imperfectives.” Department of Linguistics, Harvard University, 15 December 2006.
  13. “Language contact in the Balkans: the conflict between nationalism and multilingualism.” University of Pennsylvania, Linguistics 450: Languages in Contact, 29 November 2000; Linguistics 054: Bilingualism in History, 16 November 2006, 26 November 2002, 30 November 2000.
  14. “The vowel alternation in Tocharian A preterite participles, and linguistic (non-)contacts in Central Asia.” Kyoto University, 27 May 2006.
  15. “Indo-European languages in the Tarim basin: Historical phonology and morphology of Tocharian A and B.” Kyoto University, 20 May 2006.
  16. “Tocharian and the Indo-European verb: old problems and new insights.” Greek, Latin, and Indo-European Roundtable, Cornell University, 9 March 2006.
  17. “The value of Slavic for the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European verbal accent.” Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of California, Berkeley, 17 March 2003.
  18. ““Golden Age” glory or Balkan decadence? Reconsidering the origins of Ottoman Judeo-Spanish dialectal variation.” Department of Linguistics Speaker Series, University of Pennsylvania, 21 November 2002.
  19. “Some Indo-European archaisms in modern Greek.” Program in Hellenic Studies, Princeton University, 26 April 2002.
  20. “The importance of theory for historical linguistics: two examples from Indo-European accent.” Department of Linguistics, Swarthmore College, 21 February 2002.
  21. “Greek from Alexander to the present: a brief survey.” University of Pennsylvania, Greek 503: Historical Grammar of Greek, 4 December 2001.
  22. “Reconstructing backwards and forwards: the prehistory of Balto-Slavic accent in Indo-European perspective.” Program in Linguistics, Princeton University, 11 April 2001.
Invited conference workshops
  1. “From West Germanic to World Englishes: internal and external change in the history of English.” 3rd Young Linguists’ Meeting in Poznań, School of English, Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań, 25-27 May 2012.
  2. “Current approaches to language variation and change: bringing together historical linguistics and sociolinguistics.” 2nd Young Linguists’ Meeting in Poznań, School of English, Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań, 23-25 April 2010.
Invited conference papers
  • East Coast Indo-European Conference, 1998-2008 and 2010-2014
  • 43rd Poznań Linguistics Meeting, Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań, 8-10 September 2012
  • Workshop on Indo-European Accentology, Sprachwissenschaftliches Seminar, Georg August University of Göttingen, 24-26 March 2010
  • Tocharian Centennial Conference, Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow, 25-27 August 2008
  • American Day, Philological School of Higher Education in Wrocław, 18 May 2008
  • Conference on Indo-European Studies, Kyoto University, 11-12 September 2007
Other conference papers
  • Arbeitstagung der Indogermanischen Gesellschaft, 2002, 2008-2011, 2014
  • UCLA Indo-European Conference, University of California, Los Angeles, 2002, 2005-2006
  • Penn Linguistics Colloquium, University of Pennsylvania, 1998-2000, 2002
  • NWAV(E), 1998-1999
  • Tocharian Texts in Context: International Conference on Tocharian Manuscripts and Silk Road Culture, University of Vienna, 26-28 June 2013
  • The Sound of Indo-European 2, Silesian University of Opava, 16-19 November 2010
  • 41st Poznań Linguistics Meeting, Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań, 23-26 September 2010
  • Summer Meeting of the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics, University of Cologne, 11-15 August 2009
  • 7th Medieval English Studies Symposium, Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań, 22-23 November 2008
  • XI Incontro Italiano di Linguistica Camito-Semitica, Università di Bergamo, 5-7 June 2003
  • 28th North American Conference on Afroasiatic Linguistics, Portland, 10-12 March 2000
  • 10th conference of the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Linguistics Society of America, Chicago, 7-8 January 2000

Academic Service

Editorship
  • General Editor (with Joseph F. Eska), Indo-European Linguistics (2013- ) <http://www.brill.com/publications/journals/indo-european-linguistics>
  • Editor, Chatreššar: International Journal for Indo-European, Semitic, and Cuneiform Languages (2014- ) <http://usj.ff.cuni.cz/node/201>
  • Board of Reviewers, Tocharian and Indo-European Studies (2013- )
  • Board of Reviewers, Poznań Working Papers in Linguistics (2013- )
  • Board of Reviewers, Academic Journal of Modern Philology (Wrocław; 2012- )
  • Assistant Editor, University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics (2004-06)
Refereeing
  • Journals: AmS-Varia (Stavanger; 2011), Folia Linguistica Historica (2011, 2012, 2013), Indogermanische Forschungen (2013), International Journal of Diachronic Linguistics and Linguistic Reconstruction (2009), Journal of the American Oriental Society (2009, 2010 [2x]), Lingua (2011), Linguistica Brunensia (Brno; 2014), Multilingua (2013), Poznań Working Papers in Linguistics (2014), Res Celticae (Poznań; 2012)
  • Conferences: North East Linguistic Society (2010), Penn Linguistics Colloquium (2007, 2009, 2011- ), Poznań Linguistics Meeting (2012, 2013), “Typology, Theory: Caucasus” (Istanbul; 2012), Young Linguists’ Meeting in Poznań (2010, 2012, 2014)
  • Publications: Václav Blažek, Works 1. Tocharica, ed. by Michal Schwarz (Brno: Masaryk University Press, 2011)
  • Grants: Melanie Malzahn, “A Comprehensive Edition of Tocharian Manuscripts” (Austrian Science Fund), 2010
  • Member, Panel of Experts in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Narodowe Centrum Nauki (National Science Center, Cracow), 2012-
Conference and lecture organizing
  • Organizing committee, “Hrozný and Hittite: The First Hundred Years”, Charles University of Prague, 12-14 November 2015
  • Co-organizer of the 32rd East Coast Indo-European Conference, Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań, 21-24 June 2013 (with Piotr Gąsiorowski)
  • Co-organizer of the lecture series “Indogermanische Sprachen und Kulturen an der Seidenstraße”, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, 2009 (with Olav Hackstein)
  • Organizing committee, Penn Linguistics Colloquium (1999, 2000)

Aktuality

There are no new announcements.